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AIM

10/12/17

2

−3−3

Airport Marking Aids and Signs

FIG 2

−3−2

Nonprecision Instrument Runway and Visual Runway Markings

20

20

AIMING POINT
MARKING

THRESHOLD     THRESHOLD

MARKINGS

DESIGNATION
MARKING

PAVEMENT EDGE

AIMING POINT
MARKING

PAVEMENT EDGE

DESIGNATION MARKING

THRESHOLD

NONPRECISION INSTRUMENT RUNWAY MARKINGS

VISUAL RUNWAY MARKINGS

f. Runway Side Stripe Marking.

Runway side

stripes delineate the edges of the runway. They
provide a visual contrast between runway and the
abutting terrain or shoulders. Side stripes consist of
continuous white stripes located on each side of the
runway as shown in FIG 2

−3−4.

g. Runway Shoulder Markings.

Runway shoul-

der stripes may be used to supplement runway side
stripes to identify pavement areas contiguous to the
runway sides that are not intended for use by aircraft.
Runway shoulder stripes are yellow. 
(See FIG 2

−3−5.)

h. Runway Threshold Markings.

Runway

threshold markings come in two configurations. They
either consist of eight longitudinal stripes of uniform

dimensions disposed symmetrically about the
runway centerline (as shown in FIG 2

−3−1) or the

number of stripes is related to the runway width as
indicated in TBL 2

−3−2. A threshold marking helps

identify the beginning of the runway that is available
for landing. In some instances, the landing threshold
may be relocated or displaced.

TBL 2

−3−2

Number of Runway Threshold Stripes

Runway Width

Number of Stripes

60 feet (18 m)

4

75 feet (23 m)

6

100 feet (30 m)

8

150 feet (45 m)

12

200 feet (60 m)

16