background image

AIM

10/12/17

4

−1−14

Services Available to Pilots

(b)

When not assigned an altitude, the pilot

should coordinate with ATC prior to any altitude
change.

8.

Within the TRSA, traffic information on

observed but unidentified targets will, to the extent
possible, be provided to all IFR and participating
VFR aircraft. The pilot will be vectored upon request
to avoid the observed traffic, provided the aircraft to
be vectored is within the airspace under the
jurisdiction of the controller.

9.

Departing aircraft should inform ATC of their

intended destination and/or route of flight and
proposed cruising altitude.

10.

ATC will normally advise participating

VFR aircraft when leaving the geographical limits of
the TRSA. Radar service is not automatically
terminated with this advisory unless specifically
stated by the controller.

c. Class C Service.

This service provides, in

addition to basic radar service, approved separation
between IFR and VFR aircraft, and sequencing of
VFR arrivals to the primary airport.

d. Class B Service.

This service provides, in

addition to basic radar service, approved separation
of aircraft based on IFR, VFR, and/or weight, and
sequencing of VFR arrivals to the primary airport(s)

.

e. PILOT RESPONSIBILITY.

THESE SER-

VICES ARE NOT TO BE INTERPRETED AS
RELIEVING PILOTS OF THEIR RESPONSIBILI-
TIES TO SEE AND AVOID OTHER TRAFFIC
OPERATING IN BASIC VFR WEATHER CONDI-
TIONS, TO ADJUST THEIR OPERATIONS AND
FLIGHT PATH AS NECESSARY TO PRECLUDE
SERIOUS WAKE ENCOUNTERS, TO MAINTAIN
APPROPRIATE TERRAIN AND OBSTRUCTION
CLEARANCE, OR TO REMAIN IN WEATHER
CONDITIONS EQUAL TO OR BETTER THAN
THE MINIMUMS REQUIRED BY 14 CFR
SECTION 91.155. WHENEVER COMPLIANCE
WITH AN ASSIGNED ROUTE, HEADING
AND/OR ALTITUDE IS LIKELY TO COMPRO-
MISE PILOT RESPONSIBILITY RESPECTING
TERRAIN AND OBSTRUCTION CLEARANCE,
VORTEX EXPOSURE, AND WEATHER MINI-
MUMS, APPROACH CONTROL SHOULD BE SO
ADVISED AND A REVISED CLEARANCE OR
INSTRUCTION OBTAINED

.

f.

ATC services for VFR aircraft participating in

terminal radar services are dependent on ATC radar.
Services for VFR aircraft are not available during
periods of a radar outage and are limited during
CENRAP operations. The pilot will be advised when
VFR services are limited or not available.

NOTE

Class B and Class C airspace are areas of regulated
airspace. The absence of ATC radar does not negate the
requirement of an ATC clearance to enter Class B airspace
or two way radio contact with ATC to enter Class C
airspace.

4

−1−19. Tower En Route Control (TEC)

a.

TEC is an ATC program to provide a service to

aircraft proceeding to and from metropolitan areas. It
links designated Approach Control Areas by a
network of identified routes made up of the existing
airway structure of the National Airspace System.
The FAA initiated an expanded TEC program to
include as many facilities as possible. The program’s
intent is to provide an overflow resource in the low
altitude system which would enhance ATC services.
A few facilities have historically allowed turbojets to
proceed between certain city pairs, such as
Milwaukee and Chicago, via tower en route and these
locations may continue this service. However, the
expanded TEC program will be applied, generally,
for nonturbojet aircraft operating at and below
10,000 feet. The program is entirely within the
approach control airspace of multiple terminal
facilities. Essentially, it is for relatively short flights.
Participating pilots are encouraged to use TEC for
flights of two hours duration or less. If longer flights
are planned, extensive coordination may be required
within the multiple complex which could result in
unanticipated delays.

b.

Pilots requesting TEC are subject to the same

delay factor at the destination airport as other aircraft
in the ATC system. In addition, departure and en route
delays may occur depending upon individual facility
workload. When a major metropolitan airport is
incurring significant delays, pilots in the TEC
program may want to consider an alternative airport
experiencing no delay.

c.

There are no unique requirements upon pilots to

use the TEC program. Normal flight plan filing
procedures will ensure proper flight plan processing.
Pilots should include the acronym “TEC” in the