background image

6/17/21 

AIM 

is impractical for safety reasons, the crew should 
proceed according to their best judgment while 
understanding the illuminated lights indicate that 
continuing the takeoff is unsafe. Contact ATC at the 
earliest possible opportunity. 

d. 

Pilot Actions: 

1. 

When operating at airports with RWSL, pilots 

will operate with the transponder/ADS

B “On” when 

departing the gate or parking area until it is shut down 
upon arrival at the gate or parking area. This ensures 
interaction with the FAA surveillance systems such 
as ASDE­X/Airport Surface Surveillance Capability 
(ASSC) which provide information to the RWSL 
system. 

2. 

Pilots must always inform the ATCT when 

they have stopped due to an RWSL indication that is 
in conflict with ATC instructions. Pilots must request 
clarification of the taxi or takeoff clearance. 

3. 

Never cross over illuminated red lights. 

Under normal circumstances, RWSL will confirm the 
pilot’s taxi or takeoff clearance previously issued by 
ATC. If RWSL indicates that it is unsafe to takeoff 
from, land on, cross, or enter a runway, immediately 
notify ATC of the conflict and re­confirm the 
clearance. 

4. 

Do not proceed when lights have extin­

guished without an ATC clearance. RWSL verifies an 
ATC clearance; it does not substitute for an ATC 
clearance. 

5. 

Never land if PAPI continues to flash. 

Execute a go around and notify ATC. 

e. 

ATC Control of RWSL System: 

1. 

Controllers can set in

pavement lights to one 

of five (5) brightness levels to assure maximum 
conspicuity under all visibility and lighting condi­

tions. REL and THL subsystems may be 
independently set. 

2. 

System lights can be disabled should RWSL 

operations impact the efficient movement of air 
traffic or contribute, in the opinion of the assigned 
ATC Manager, to unsafe operations. REL and THL 
light fixtures may be disabled separately. Whenever 
the system or a component is disabled, a NOTAM 
must be issued, and the Automatic Terminal 
Information System (ATIS) must be updated. 

2

1

7.  Control of Lighting Systems 

a. 

Operation of approach light systems and 

runway lighting is controlled by the control tower 
(ATCT). At some locations the FSS may control the 
lights where there is no control tower in operation. 

b. 

Pilots may request that lights be turned on or off. 

Runway edge lights, in

pavement lights and 

approach lights also have intensity controls which 
may be varied to meet the pilots request. Sequenced 
flashing lights (SFL) may be turned on and off. Some 
sequenced flashing light systems also have intensity 
control. 

2

1

8.  Pilot Control of Airport Lighting 

Radio control of lighting is available at selected 
airports to provide airborne control of lights by 
keying the aircraft’s microphone. Control of lighting 
systems is often available at locations without 
specified hours for lighting and where there is no 
control tower or FSS or when the tower or FSS is 
closed (locations with a part

time tower or FSS) or 

specified hours. All lighting systems which are radio 
controlled at an airport, whether on a single runway 
or multiple runways, operate on the same radio 
frequency. (See TBL 2

1

1 and TBL 2

1

2.) 

Airport Lighting Aids 

2

1