background image

6/17/21 

AIM 

satellite airport in proximity to the major primary 
airport via the same routing. 

4

1

20.  Transponder and ADS

B Out 

Operation 

a.  General 

1. 

Pilots should be aware that proper application 

of transponder and ADS

B operating procedures will 

provide both VFR and IFR aircraft with a higher 
degree of safety while operating on the ground and 
airborne. Transponder/ADS

B panel designs differ; 

therefore, a pilot should be thoroughly familiar with 
the operation of their particular equipment to 
maximize its full potential. ADS

B Out, and 

transponders with altitude reporting mode turned ON 
(Mode C or S), substantially increase the capability of 
surveillance systems to see an aircraft. This provides 
air traffic controllers, as well as pilots of suitably 
equipped aircraft (TCAS and ADS

B In), increased 

situational awareness and the ability to identify 
potential traffic conflicts. Even VFR pilots who are 
not in contact with ATC will be afforded greater 
protection from IFR aircraft and VFR aircraft that are 
receiving traffic advisories. Nevertheless, pilots 
should never relax their visual scanning for other 
aircraft. 

2. 

Air Traffic Control Radar Beacon System 

(ATCRBS) is similar to and compatible with military 
coded radar beacon equipment. Civil Mode A is 
identical to military Mode 3. 

3.  Transponder and ADS­B operations on the 

ground

. Civil and military aircraft should operate 

with the transponder in the altitude reporting mode 
(consult the aircraft’s flight manual to determine the 
specific transponder position to enable altitude 
reporting) and ADS

B Out transmissions enabled at 

all airports, any time the aircraft is positioned on any 
portion of the airport movement area. This includes 
all defined taxiways and runways. Pilots must pay 
particular attention to ATIS and airport diagram 
notations, General Notes (included on airport charts), 
and comply with directions pertaining to transponder 
and ADS­B usage. Generally, these directions are: 

(a)  Departures.

 Select the transponder mode 

which allows altitude reporting and enable ADS­B 
during pushback or taxi­out from parking spot. Select 
TA or TA/RA (if equipped with TCAS) when taking 
the active runway. 

(b)  Arrivals.

 If TCAS equipped, deselect TA 

or TA/RA upon leaving the active runway, but 
continue transponder and ADS

B transmissions in 

the altitude reporting mode. Select STBY or OFF for 
transponder and ADS

B upon arriving at the 

aircraft’s parking spot or gate. 

4.  Transponder and ADS­B Operations 

While Airborne. 

(a) 

Unless otherwise requested by ATC, 

aircraft equipped with an ATC transponder main­
tained in accordance with 14 CFR Section 91.413 
MUST operate with this equipment on the 
appropriate Mode 3/A code, or other code as assigned 
by ATC, and with altitude reporting enabled 
whenever in controlled airspace. If practicable, 
aircraft SHOULD operate with the transponder 
enabled in uncontrolled airspace. 

(b) 

Aircraft equipped with ADS

B Out 

MUST operate with this equipment in the transmit 
mode at all times, unless otherwise requested by 
ATC. 

(c) 

When participating in a VFR formation 

flight that is not receiving ATC services, only the lead 
aircraft should operate their transponder and ADS

Out. All other aircraft should disable transponder and 
ADS

B transmissions once established within the 

formation. 

NOTE

 

If the formation flight is receiving ATC services, pilots can 
expect ATC to direct all non

lead aircraft to STOP 

SQUAWK, and should not do so until instructed. 

5. 

A pilot on an IFR flight who elects to cancel 

the IFR flight plan prior to reaching their destination, 
should adjust the transponder/ADS

B according to 

VFR operations. 

6. 

If entering a U.S. OFFSHORE AIRSPACE 

AREA from outside the U.S., the pilot should advise 
on first radio contact with a U.S. radar ATC facility 
that such equipment is available by adding 
“transponder” or “ADS

B” (if equipped) to the 

aircraft identification. 

7. 

It should be noted by all users of ATC 

transponders and ADS

B Out systems that the 

surveillance coverage they can expect is limited to 
“line of sight” with ground radar and ADS

B radio 

sites. Low altitude or aircraft antenna shielding by the 
aircraft itself may result in reduced range or loss of 
aircraft contact. Though ADS

B often provides 

Services Available to Pilots 

4

1

15