background image

AIM 

12/2/21 

b.  Air Ambulance Flights. 

Because of the priority afforded air ambulance flights 
in the ATC system, extreme discretion is necessary 
when using the term “MEDEVAC.” It is only 
intended for those missions of an urgent medical 
nature and to be utilized only for that portion of the 
flight requiring priority handling. It is important for 
ATC to be aware of a flight’s MEDEVAC status, and 
it is the pilot’s responsibility to ensure that this 
information is provided to ATC. 

1. 

To receive priority handling from ATC, the 

pilot must verbally identify the flight in radio 
transmissions by stating “MEDEVAC” followed by 
the FAA authorized call sign (ICAO 3LD, US 
Special, or local) or the aircraft civil “N” registration 
numbers/letters. 

EXAMPLE

 

If the aircraft identification of the flight indicates DAL51, 
the pilot states “MEDEVAC Delta Fifty One.” 

If the aircraft identification of the flight indicates 
MDSTR1, the pilot states “MEDEVAC Medstar One.” 

If the aircraft identification of the flight indicates N123G 
or LN123G, the pilot states “MEDEVAC One Two Three 
Golf”. 

2. 

If requested by the pilot, ATC will provide 

additional assistance (e.g., landline notifications) to 
expedite ground handling of patients, vital organs, or 
urgently needed medical materials. When possible 
make these requests to ATC via methods other than 
through ATC radio frequencies. 

3. 

MEDEVAC flights may include: 

(a) 

Civilian air ambulance flights responding 

to medical emergencies (e.g., first call to an accident 
scene, carrying patients, organ donors, organs, or 
other urgently needed lifesaving medical material). 

(b) 

Air carrier and air taxi flights responding 

to medical emergencies. The nature of these medical 
emergency flights usually concerns the transporta­
tion of urgently needed lifesaving medical materials 
or vital organs, but can include inflight medical 
emergencies. It is imperative that the company/pilot 
determine, by the nature/urgency of the specific 
medical cargo, if priority ATC assistance is required. 

4.

 When filing a flight plan, pilots may include 

“L” for MEDEVAC with the aircraft registration 
letters/digits and/or include “MEDEVAC” in Item 11 

(Remarks) of the flight plan or Item 18 (Other 
Information) of an international flight plan. However, 
ATC will only use these flight plan entries for 
informational purposes or as a visual indicator. ATC 
will only provide priority handling when the pilot 
verbally identifies the “MEDEVAC” status of the 
flight as described in subparagraph b1 above. 

NOTE

 

Civilian air ambulance aircraft operating VFR and 
without a filed flight plan are eligible for priority handling 
in accordance with subparagraph b1 above. 

5. 

ATC will also provide priority handling to 

HOSP and AIR EVAC flights when verbally 
requested. These aircraft may file “HOSP” or “AIR 
EVAC” in either Item 11 (Remarks) of the flight plan 
or Item 18 of an international flight plan. For aircraft 
identification in radio transmissions, civilian pilots 
will use normal call signs when filing “HOSP” and 
military pilots will use the “EVAC” call sign. 

c.  Student Pilots Radio Identification. 

1. 

The FAA desires to help student pilots in 

acquiring sufficient practical experience in the 
environment in which they will be required to 
operate. To receive additional assistance while 
operating in areas of concentrated air traffic, student 
pilots need only identify themselves as a student pilot 
during their initial call to an FAA radio facility. 

EXAMPLE

 

Dayton tower, Fleetwing One Two Three Four, student 
pilot. 

2. 

This special identification will alert FAA 

ATC personnel and enable them to provide student 
pilots with such extra assistance and consideration as 
they may need. It is recommended that student pilots 
identify themselves as such, on initial contact with 
each clearance delivery prior to taxiing, ground 
control, tower, approach and departure control 
frequency, or FSS contact. 

4

2

5.  Description of Interchange or 

Leased Aircraft 

a. 

Controllers issue traffic information based on 

familiarity with airline equipment and color/ 
markings. When an air carrier dispatches a flight 
using another company’s equipment and the pilot 
does not advise the terminal ATC facility, the possible 
confusion in aircraft identification can compromise 
safety. 

b. 

Pilots flying an “interchange” or “leased” 

aircraft not bearing the colors/markings of the 

4

2

Radio Communications Phraseology