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AIM 

12/2/21 

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7.  Flight Plans For Military/DOD Use 

Only 

(See Appendix 4, FAA Form 7233

1, Flight Plan) 

Within U.S. controlled airspace, FAA Form 7233

or DD Form 175 may be used by DOD aircraft. 
However, use of the DD Form 1801 by DOD aircraft 
is recommended for IFR flights and is mandatory for: 

a. 

Any flight that will depart U.S. controlled 

airspace. 

b. 

Any flight requesting routing that requires 

Performance Based Navigation. 

c. 

Any flight requesting services that require filing 

of capabilities only supported in the international 
flight plan. 

NOTE

 

1. 

The order of flight plan elements in DD Form 175 is 

equivalent to that of FAA Form 7233

1. 

2. 

Civilians who file stereo route flight plans, may  use FAA 

Form 7233

1, Flight Plan. 

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8.  Flight Plan – Defense VFR (DVFR) 

Flights 

VFR flights (except for DOD and law enforcement 
flights) into an ADIZ are required to file DVFR flight 
plans for security purposes. Detailed ADIZ proce-
dures are found in Section 6, National Security and 
Interception Procedures, of this chapter. 

REFERENCE

 

14 CFR Part 99, Security Control for Air Traffic. 

a. 

DVFR flight plans must be filed using FAA 

Form 7233

4 or DD Form 1801. 

b. 

Enter the letter “D” in Item 8, Type of Flight, of 

FAA Form 7233

4 or DD Form 1801. 

c. 

DVFR flights where pilots decline search and 

rescue coverage must clearly indicate “NORIV” in 
Item 18 following the indicator “RMK/.” This flight 
plan must still be activated in order to properly notify 
NORAD, however no flight plan cancellation will be 
expected. 

EXAMPLE

 

RMK/NORIV 

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9.  Single Flights Conducted With Both 

VFR and IFR Flight Plans 

a. 

Flight plans which combine VFR operation on 

an active VFR flight plan for one portion of a flight, 
and IFR for another portion, sometimes known as a 
composite flight plan, cannot be accepted or 
processed by current en route automation systems. 

b. 

Pilots are free to operate VFR in VFR 

conditions prior to accepting an IFR clearance from 
the appropriate control facility, or may cancel an IFR 
clearance and proceed VFR as desired. However, if a 
pilot desires to be on an active VFR flight plan, with 
search and rescue provisions, for the portion of flight 
not conducted under an IFR clearance, a separate 
VFR flight plan must be filed, activated, and closed. 

c. 

If a pilot desires to be on an active VFR flight 

plan prior to or following the IFR portion of the flight, 
that flight plan must be filed and processed as a 
distinct and separate flight plan. The VFR flight plan 
must be opened and closed with either a Flight 
Service Station or other service provider having the 
capability to open and close VFR flight plans. Air 
Traffic Control does not have the ability to determine 
if an aircraft is operating on an active VFR flight plan 
and cannot process the activation or cancellation of a 
VFR flight plan. 

d. 

Pilots may propose to commence the IFR 

portion of flight at a defined airborne point. This 
airborne point, or fix, is entered as the departure point 
in Item 13 of FAA Form 7233

4 or DD Form 1801. 

e. 

Pilots may indicate in the IFR flight plan the 

intention to terminate the IFR portion of flight at any 
defined airborne point. The airborne point, or fix, is 
entered as the destination point in Item 16 of FAA 
Form 7233

4 or DD Form 1801. 

f. 

Prior to beginning the IFR portion of flight, a 

pilot must receive an IFR clearance from the 
appropriate control facility. 

g. 

If the pilot does not desire further clearance 

after reaching the clearance limit, he or she must 
advise ATC to cancel the IFR clearance. 

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10.  IFR Operations to High Altitude 

Destinations 

a. 

Pilots planning IFR flights to airports located in 

mountainous terrain are cautioned to consider the 
necessity for an alternate airport even when the 

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