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6/17/21 

AIM 

e.  PBN STAR. 

1. 

Public PBN STARs are normally designed 

using RNAV 1, RNP 1, or A

RNP NavSpecs. These 

procedures require system performance currently 
met by GPS or DME/DME/IRU PBN systems that 
satisfy the criteria discussed in AC 90

100A, U.S. 

Terminal and En Route Area Navigation (RNAV) 
Operations. These procedures, using RNAV 1 and 
RNP 1 NavSpecs, must maintain a total system error 
of not more than 1 NM for 95% of the total flight time. 
Minimum values for A

RNP procedures will be 

charted in the PBN box (for example, 1.00 or 0.30). 

2. 

In the U.S., a specific procedure’s PBN 

requirements will be prominently displayed in 
separate, standardized notes boxes. For procedures 
with PBN elements, the “PBN box” will contain the 
procedure’s NavSpec(s); and, if required: specific 
sensors or infrastructure needed for the navigation 
solution, any additional or advanced functional 
requirements, the minimum RNP value, and any 
amplifying remarks. Items listed in this PBN box are 
REQUIRED for the procedure’s PBN elements. 

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2.  Local Flow Traffic Management Pro-

gram 

a. 

This program is a continuing effort by the FAA 

to enhance safety, minimize the impact of aircraft 
noise and conserve aviation fuel. The enhancement of 
safety and reduction of noise is achieved in this 
program by minimizing low altitude maneuvering of 
arriving turbojet and turboprop aircraft weighing 
more than 12,500 pounds and, by permitting 
departure aircraft to climb to higher altitudes sooner, 
as arrivals are operating at higher altitudes at the 
points where their flight paths cross. The application 
of these procedures also reduces exposure time 
between controlled aircraft and uncontrolled aircraft 
at the lower altitudes in and around the terminal 
environment. Fuel conservation is accomplished by 
absorbing any necessary arrival delays for aircraft 
included in this program operating at the higher and 
more fuel efficient altitudes. 

b. 

A fuel efficient descent is basically an 

uninterrupted descent (except where level flight is 
required for speed adjustment) from cruising altitude 
to the point when level flight is necessary for the pilot 
to stabilize the aircraft on final approach. The 
procedure for a fuel efficient descent is based on an 
altitude loss which is most efficient for the majority 

of aircraft being served. This will generally result in 
a descent gradient window of 250

350 feet per 

nautical mile. 

c. 

When crossing altitudes and speed restrictions 

are issued verbally or are depicted on a chart, ATC 
will expect the pilot to descend first to the crossing 
altitude and then reduce speed. Verbal clearances for 
descent will normally permit an uninterrupted 
descent in accordance with the procedure as 
described in paragraph b above. Acceptance of a 
charted fuel efficient descent (Runway Profile 
Descent) clearance requires the pilot to adhere to the 
altitudes, speeds, and headings depicted on the charts 
unless otherwise instructed by ATC. PILOTS 
RECEIVING A CLEARANCE FOR A FUEL 
EFFICIENT DESCENT ARE EXPECTED TO 
ADVISE ATC IF THEY DO NOT HAVE RUNWAY 
PROFILE DESCENT CHARTS PUBLISHED FOR 
THAT AIRPORT OR ARE UNABLE TO COMPLY 
WITH THE CLEARANCE. 

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3.  Approach Control 

a. 

Approach control is responsible for controlling 

all instrument flight operating within its area of 
responsibility. Approach control may serve one or 
more airfields, and control is exercised primarily by 
direct pilot and controller communications. Prior to 
arriving at the destination radio facility, instructions 
will be received from ARTCC to contact approach 
control on a specified frequency. 

b.  Radar Approach Control. 

1. 

Where radar is approved for approach control 

service, it is used not only for radar approaches 
(Airport Surveillance Radar [ASR] and Precision 
Approach Radar [PAR]) but is also used to provide 
vectors in conjunction with published nonradar 
approaches based on radio NAVAIDs (ILS, VOR, 
NDB, TACAN). Radar vectors can provide course 
guidance and expedite traffic to the final approach 
course of any established IAP or to the traffic pattern 
for a visual approach. Approach control facilities that 
provide this radar service will operate in the 
following manner: 

(a) 

Arriving aircraft are either cleared to an 

outer fix most appropriate to the route being flown 
with vertical separation and, if required, given 
holding information or, when radar handoffs are 
effected between the ARTCC and approach control, 
or between two approach control facilities, aircraft 

Arrival Procedures 

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