background image

AIM 

12/2/21 

operating at 130 knots on a straight

in approach 

should use the approach Category C minimums. 

c. 

A pilot who chooses an alternative method 

when it is necessary to maneuver at a speed that 
exceeds the category speed limit (for example, where 
higher category minimums are not published) should 
consider the following factors that can significantly 
affect the actual ground track flown: 

1. 

Bank angle. For example, at 165 knots 

groundspeed, the radius of turn increases from 
4,194 feet using 30 degrees of bank to 6,654 feet 
when using 20 degrees of bank. When using a 
shallower bank angle, it may be necessary to modify 
the flightpath or indicated airspeed to remain within 
the circling approach protected area. Pilots should be 
aware that excessive bank angle can lead to a loss of 
aircraft control. 

2. 

Indicated airspeed. Procedure design criteria 

typically utilize the highest speed for a particular 
category. If a pilot chooses to operate at a higher 
speed, other factors should be modified to ensure that 
the aircraft remains within the circling approach 
protected area. 

3. 

Wind speed and direction. For example, it is 

not uncommon to maneuver the aircraft to a 
downwind leg where the groundspeed will be 
considerably higher than the indicated airspeed. 
Pilots must carefully plan the initiation of all turns to 
ensure that the aircraft remains within the circling 
approach protected area. 

4. 

Pilot technique. Pilots frequently have many 

options with regard to flightpath when conducting 
circling approaches. Sound planning and judgment 
are vital to proper execution. The lateral and vertical 
path to be flown should be carefully considered using 
current weather and terrain information to ensure that 
the aircraft remains within the circling approach 
protected area. 

d. 

It is important to remember that 14 CFR 

Section 91.175(c) requires that “where a DA/DH or 
MDA is applicable, no pilot may operate an aircraft 
below the authorized MDA or continue an approach 
below the authorized DA/DH unless the aircraft is 
continuously in a position from which a descent to a 
landing on the intended runway can be made at a 
normal rate of descent using normal maneuvers, and 
for operations conducted under Part 121 or Part 135 
unless that descent rate will allow touchdown to 

occur within the touchdown zone of the runway of 
intended landing.” 

e. 

See the following category limits: 

1. 

Category A:  Speed less than 91 knots. 

2. 

Category B:  Speed 91 knots or more but less 

than 121 knots. 

3. 

Category C:  Speed 121 knots or more but 

less than 141 knots. 

4. 

Category D:  Speed 141 knots or more but 

less than 166 knots. 

5. 

Category E:  Speed 166 knots or more. 

NOTE

 

V

REF

 in the above definition refers to the speed used in 

establishing the approved landing distance under the 
airworthiness regulations constituting the type certifica-
tion basis of the airplane, regardless of whether that speed 
for a particular airplane is 1.3 

V

SO,

 1.23 

V

SR,

 or some 

higher speed required for airplane controllability. This 
speed, at the maximum certificated landing weight, 
determines the lowest applicable approach category for 
all approaches regardless of actual landing weight. 

f. 

When operating on an unpublished route or 

while being radar vectored, the pilot, when an 
approach clearance is received, must, in addition to 
complying with the minimum altitudes for IFR 
operations (14 CFR Section 91.177), maintain the 
last assigned altitude unless a different altitude is 
assigned by ATC, or until the aircraft is established on 
a segment of a published route or IAP. After the 
aircraft is so established, published altitudes apply to 
descent within each succeeding route or approach 
segment unless a different altitude is assigned by 
ATC. Notwithstanding this pilot responsibility, for 
aircraft operating on unpublished routes or while 
being radar vectored, ATC will, except when 
conducting a radar approach, issue an IFR approach 
clearance only after the aircraft is established on a 
segment of a published route or IAP, or assign an 
altitude to maintain until the aircraft is established on 
a segment of a published route or instrument 
approach procedure. For this purpose, the procedure 
turn of a published IAP must not be considered a 
segment of that IAP until the aircraft reaches the 
initial fix or navigation facility upon which the 
procedure turn is predicated. 

EXAMPLE

 

Cross Redding VOR at or above five thousand, cleared 
VOR runway three four approach. 
  or 

Arrival Procedures 

5

4

28