background image

12/2/21 

AIM 

interfere with the pilot’s ability to see the external 
scene, to identify the required visual references, or to 
see the sensor image. 

m.  Additional Information. 

Operational criteria 

for EFVS can be found in Advisory Circular (AC) 
90

106, Enhanced Flight Vision System Operations, 

and airworthiness criteria for EFVS can be found in 
AC 20

167,  Airworthiness Approval of Enhanced 

Vision System, Synthetic Vision System, Combined 
Vision System, and Enhanced Flight Vision System 
Equipment. 

5

4

23.  Visual Approach 

a. 

A visual approach is conducted on an IFR flight 

plan and authorizes a pilot to proceed visually and 
clear of clouds to the airport. The pilot must have 
either the airport or the preceding identified aircraft 
in sight. This approach must be authorized and 
controlled by the appropriate air traffic control 
facility. Reported weather at the airport must have a 
ceiling at or above 1,000 feet and visibility 3 miles or 
greater. ATC may authorize this type of approach 
when it will be operationally beneficial. Visual 
approaches are an IFR procedure conducted under 
IFR in visual meteorological conditions. Cloud 
clearance requirements of 14 CFR Section 91.155 are 
not applicable, unless required by operation 
specifications. When conducting visual approaches, 
pilots are encouraged to use other available 
navigational aids to assist in positive lateral and 
vertical alignment with the runway. 

b.  Operating to an Airport Without Weather 

Reporting Service. 

ATC will advise the pilot when 

weather is not available at the destination airport. 
ATC may initiate a visual approach provided there is 
a reasonable assurance that weather at the airport is a 
ceiling at or above 1,000 feet and visibility 3 miles or 
greater (e.g., area weather reports, PIREPs, etc.). 

c.  Operating to an Airport With an Operating 

Control Tower

. Aircraft may be authorized to 

conduct a visual approach to one runway while other 
aircraft are conducting IFR or VFR approaches to 
another parallel, intersecting, or converging runway. 
ATC may authorize a visual approach after advising 
all aircraft involved that other aircraft are conducting 
operations to the other runway. This may be 
accomplished through use of the ATIS. 

1. 

When operating to parallel runways separat­

ed by less than 2,500 feet, ATC will ensure approved 
separation is provided unless the succeeding aircraft 
reports sighting the preceding aircraft to the adjacent 
parallel and visual separation is applied. 

2. 

When operating to parallel runways separat­

ed by at least 2,500 feet but less than 4,300 feet, ATC 
will ensure approved separation is provided until the 
aircraft are issued an approach clearance and one 
pilot has acknowledged receipt of a visual approach 
clearance, and the other pilot has acknowledged 
receipt of a visual or instrument approach clearance, 
and aircraft are established on a heading or 
established on a direct course to a fix or cleared on an 
RNAV/instrument approach procedure which will 
intercept the extended centerline of the runway at an 
angle not greater than 30 degrees. 

3. 

When operating to parallel runways separat­

ed by 4,300 feet or more, ATC will ensure approved 
separation is provided until one of the aircraft has 
been issued and the pilot has acknowledged receipt of 
the visual approach clearance, and each aircraft is 
assigned a heading, or established on a direct course 
to a fix, or cleared on an RNAV/instrument approach 
procedure which will allow the aircraft to intercept 
the extended centerline of the runway at an angle not 
greater than 30 degrees. 

NOTE

 

The intent of the 30 degree intercept angle is to reduce the 
potential for overshoots of the final and to preclude 
side

by

side operations with one or both aircraft in a 

belly

up configuration during the turn

on. 

d.  Separation Responsibilities. 

If the pilot has 

the airport in sight but cannot see the aircraft to be 
followed, ATC may clear the aircraft for a visual 
approach; however, ATC retains both separation and 
wake vortex separation responsibility. When visually 
following a preceding aircraft, acceptance of the 
visual approach clearance constitutes acceptance of 
pilot responsibility for maintaining a safe approach 
interval and adequate wake turbulence separation. 

e. 

A visual approach is not an IAP and therefore 

has no missed approach segment. If a go around is 
necessary for any reason, aircraft operating at 
controlled airports will be issued an appropriate 
advisory/clearance/instruction by the tower. At 
uncontrolled airports, aircraft are expected to remain 
clear of clouds and complete a landing as soon as 
possible. If a landing cannot be accomplished, the 
aircraft is expected to remain clear of clouds and 

Arrival Procedures 

5

4

61