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AIM 

6/17/21 

EXAMPLE

 

1. 

KCMH UA /OV APE 230010/TM 1516/FL085/TP 

BE20/SK BKN065/WX FV03SM HZ FU/TA 20/TB LGT 

NOTE

 

1. 

One zero miles southwest of Appleton VOR; time 

1516 UTC; altitude eight thousand five hundred; aircraft 
type BE200; bases of the broken cloud layer is six thousand 
five hundred; flight visibility 3 miles with haze and smoke; 
air temperature 20 degrees Celsius; light turbulence. 

EXAMPLE

 

2. 

KCRW UV /OV KBKW 360015

KCRW/TM 

1815/FL120//TP BE99/SK IMC/WX RA/TA M08 /WV 

290030/TB LGT

MDT/IC LGT RIME/RM MDT MXD 

ICG DURC KROA NWBND FL080

100 1750Z 

NOTE

 

2. 

From 15 miles north of Beckley VOR to Charles-

ton VOR; time 1815 UTC; altitude 12,000 feet; type 
aircraft, BE

99; in clouds; rain; temperature minus 

8 Celsius; wind 290 degrees magnetic at 30 knots; light to 
moderate turbulence; light rime icing during climb 
northwestbound from Roanoke, VA, between 8,000 and 
10,000 feet at 1750 UTC. 

f. 

For more detailed information on PIREPS, users 

can refer to the current version of AC 00

45, Aviation 

Weather Services. 

TBL 7

1

PIREP Element Code Chart 

PIREP ELEMENT 

PIREP CODE 

CONTENTS 

1. 

3

letter station identifier 

XXX 

Nearest weather reporting location to the reported phenomenon 

2. 

Report type 

UA or UUA 

Routine or Urgent PIREP 

3. 

Location 

/OV 

In relation to a VOR 

4. 

Time 

/TM 

Coordinated Universal Time 

5. 

Altitude 

/FL 

Essential for turbulence and icing reports 

6. 

Type Aircraft 

/TP 

Essential for turbulence and icing reports 

7. 

Sky cover 

/SK 

Cloud height and coverage (sky clear, few, scattered, broken, or 
overcast) 

8. 

Weather 

/WX 

Flight visibility, precipitation, restrictions to visibility, etc. 

9. 

Temperature 

/TA 

Degrees Celsius 

10.  Wind 

/WV 

Direction in degrees magnetic north and speed in knots 

11.  Turbulence 

/TB 

See AIM paragraph 7

1

21 

12.  Icing 

/IC 

See AIM paragraph 7

1

19 

13.  Remarks 

/RM 

For reporting elements not included or to clarify previously 
reported items 

7

1

19.  PIREPs Relating to Airframe Icing 

a. 

The effects of ice on aircraft are cumulative-

thrust is reduced, drag increases, lift lessens, and 
weight increases. The results are an increase in stall 
speed and a deterioration of aircraft performance. In 
extreme cases, 2 to 3 inches of ice can form on the 
leading edge of the airfoil in less than 5 minutes. It 
takes but 

1

/

2

 inch of ice to reduce the lifting power of 

some aircraft by 50 percent and increases the 
frictional drag by an equal percentage. 

b. 

A pilot can expect icing when flying in visible 

precipitation, such as rain or cloud droplets, and the 
temperature is between +02 and 

10 degrees Celsius. 

When icing is detected, a pilot should do one of two 

things, particularly if the aircraft is not equipped with 
deicing equipment; get out of the area of 
precipitation; or go to an altitude where the 
temperature is above freezing. This “warmer” 
altitude may not always be a lower altitude. Proper 
preflight action includes obtaining information on the 
freezing level and the above freezing levels in 
precipitation areas. Report icing to ATC, and if 
operating IFR, request new routing or altitude if icing 
will be a hazard. Be sure to give the type of aircraft to 
ATC when reporting icing. The following describes 
how to report icing conditions. 

1.  Trace. 

Ice becomes noticeable. The rate of 

accumulation is slightly greater than the rate of 

7

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Meteorology