background image

6/17/21 

AIM 

Section 3.  Cold Temperature Barometric Altimeter 

Errors, Setting Procedures and Cold Temperature 

Airports (CTA) 

7

3

1.  Effect of Cold Temperature on 

Barometric Altimeters 

a. 

Temperature has an effect on the accuracy of 

barometric altimeters, indicated altitude, and true 
altitude. The standard temperature at sea level is 15 
degrees Celsius (59 degrees Fahrenheit). The 
temperature gradient from sea level is minus 2 
degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) per 1,000 
feet. For example, at 5000 feet above sea level, the 
ambient temperature on a standard day would be 5 
degrees Celsius. When the ambient (at altitude) 
temperature is colder than standard, the aircraft’s true 
altitude is lower than the indicated barometric 

altitude. When the ambient temperature is warmer 
than the standard day, the aircraft’s true altitude is 
higher than the indicated barometric altitude. 

b. 

TBL 7

3

1 indicates how much error may exist 

when operating in non

standard cold temperatures. 

To use the table, find the reported temperature in the 
left column, and read across the top row to locate the 
height above the airport (subtract the airport elevation 
from the flight altitude). Find the intersection of the 
temperature row and height above airport column. 
This number represents how far the aircraft may be 
below the indicated altitude due to possible cold 
temperature induced error. 

TBL 7

3

ICAO Cold Temperature Error Table 

7

3

2.  Pre

Flight Planning for Cold 

Temperature Altimeter Errors 

Flight planning into a CTA may be accomplished 
prior to flight. Use the predicted coldest temperature 
for plus or minus 1 hour of the estimated time of 
arrival and compare against the CTA published 
temperature. If the predicted temperature is at or 
below CTA temperature, calculate an altitude 
correction using TBL 7

3

1. This correction may be 

used at the CTA if the actual arrival temperature is the 
same as the temperature used to calculate the altitude 
correction during preflight planning. 

7

3

3.  Effects of Cold Temperature on 

Baro

Vertical Navigation (VNAV) Vertical 

Guidance 

Non

standard temperatures can result in a change to 

effective vertical paths and actual descent rates when 
using aircraft baro

VNAV equipment for vertical 

guidance on final approach segments. A lower than 
standard temperature will result in a shallower 
descent angle and reduced descent rate. Conversely, 
a higher than standard temperature will result in a 
steeper angle and increased descent rate. Pilots 
should consider potential consequences of these 
effects on approach minima, power settings, sight 

Cold Temperature Barometric Altimeter Errors, Setting Procedures and Cold Temperature 

7

3

Airports (CTA)