background image

12/2/21 

AIM 

including the available IAFs is displayed and the pilot 
selects the appropriate IAF. The pilot should confirm 
that the correct final approach segment was loaded by 
cross checking the Approach ID, which is also 
provided on the approach chart. 

7. 

The Along

Track Distance (ATD) during the 

final approach segment of an LNAV procedure (with 
a minimum descent altitude) will be to the MAWP. On 
LNAV/VNAV and LPV approaches to a decision 
altitude, there is no missed approach waypoint so the 
along

track distance is displayed to a point normally 

located at the runway threshold. In most cases, the 
MAWP for the LNAV approach is located on the 
runway threshold at the centerline, so these distances 
will be the same. This distance will always vary 
slightly from any ILS DME that may be present, since 
the ILS DME is located further down the runway. 
Initiation of the missed approach on the LNAV/ 
VNAV and LPV approaches is still based on reaching 
the decision altitude without any of the items listed in 
14 CFR Section 91.175 being visible, and must not be 
delayed while waiting for the ATD to reach zero. The 
WAAS receiver, unlike a GPS receiver, will 
automatically sequence past the MAWP if the missed 
approach procedure has been designed for RNAV. 
The pilot may also select missed approach prior to the 
MAWP; however, navigation will continue to the 
MAWP prior to waypoint sequencing taking place. 

1

1

19.  Ground Based Augmentation 

System (GBAS) Landing System (GLS) 

a. 

A GBAS ground installation at an airport can 

provide localized, differential augmentation to the 
Global Positioning System (GPS) signal

in

space 

enabling an aircraft’s GLS precision approach 
capability. Through the GBAS service and the 
aircraft’s GLS installation a pilot may complete an 
instrument approach offering three

dimensional 

angular, lateral, and vertical guidance for exact 
alignment and descent to a runway. The operational 
benefits of a GLS approach are similar to the benefits 
of an ILS or LPV approach operation. 

NOTE

 

To remain consistent with international terminology, the 
FAA will use the term GBAS in place of the former term 
Local Area Augmentation System (LAAS). 

b. 

An aircraft’s GLS approach capability relies on 

the broadcast from a GBAS Ground Facility (GGF) 

installation. The GGF installation includes at least 
four ground reference stations near the airport’s 
runway(s), a corrections processor, and a VHF Data 
Broadcast (VDB) uplink antenna. To use the GBAS 
GGF output and be eligible to conduct a GLS 
approach, the aircraft requires eligibility to conduct 
RNP approach (RNP APCH) operations and must 
meet the additional, specific airworthiness require­
ments for installation of a GBAS receiver intended to 
support GLS approach operations. When the aircraft 
achieves GLS approach eligibility, the aircraft’s 
onboard navigation database may then contain 
published GLS instrument approach procedures. 

c. 

During a GLS instrument approach procedure, 

the installation of an aircraft’s GLS capability 
provides the pilot three

dimensional (3D) lateral and 

vertical navigation guidance much like an ILS 
instrument approach. GBAS corrections augment the 
GPS signal

in

space by offering position correc­

tions, ensures the availability of enhanced integrity 
parameters, and then transmits the actual approach 
path definition over the VDB uplink antenna. A 
single GBAS ground station can support multiple 
GLS approaches to one or more runways. 

d. 

Through the GBAS ground station, a GLS 

approach offers a unique operational service volume 
distinct from the traditional ILS approach service 
volume (see FIG 1

1

9). However, despite the 

unique service volume, in the final approach 
segment, a GLS approach provides precise 3D 
angular lateral and vertical guidance mimicking the 
precision guidance of an ILS approach. 

e. 

Transitions to and segments of the published 

GLS instrument approach procedures may rely on use 
of RNAV 1 or RNP 1 prior to an IAF. Then, during the 
approach procedure, prior to the aircraft entering the 
GLS approach mode, a GLS approach procedure 
design uses the RNP APCH procedure design criteria 
to construct the procedural path (the criteria used to 
publish procedures titled “RNAV (GPS)” in the US). 
Thus, a GLS approach procedure may include paths 
requiring turns after the aircraft crosses the IAF, prior 
to the aircraft’s flight guidance entering the GLS 
approach flight guidance mode. Likewise, the missed 
approach procedure for a GLS approach procedure 
relies exclusively on the same missed approach 
criteria supporting an RNP APCH. 

Navigation Aids 

1

1

37