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12/2/21 

AIM 

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3.  Notice to Air Missions (NOTAM) 

System 

a.  General. 

The NOTAM system provides pilots 

with time critical aeronautical information that is 
temporary, or information to be published on 
aeronautical charts at a later date, or information from 
another operational publication. The NOTAM is 
cancelled when the information in the NOTAM is 
published on the chart or when the temporary 
condition is returned to normal status. NOTAMs may 
be disseminated up to 7 days before the start of 
activity. Pilots can access NOTAM information 
online via NOTAM Search at

:

 

https://notams.aim.faa.gov/notamSearch/ or from an 
FSS. 

b.  Preflight.

 14 CFR § 91.103, Preflight Action 

directs pilots to become familiar with all available 
information concerning a planned flight prior to 
departure, including NOTAMs. Pilots may change 
their flight plan based on available information. 
Current NOTAM information may affect: 

1. 

Aerodromes. 

2. 

Runways, taxiways, and ramp restrictions. 

3. 

Obstructions. 

4. 

Communications. 

5. 

Airspace. 

6. 

Status of navigational aids or radar service 

availability. 

7. 

Other information essential to planned en 

route, terminal, or landing operations. 

c.  ARTCC NOTAMs.

 Pilots should also review 

NOTAMs for the ARTCC area (for example, 
Washington Center (ZDC),  Cleveland Center (ZOB), 
etc.) in which the flight will be operating. You can 
find the 3 letter code for each ARTCC on the FAA’s 
NOTAM webpage. These NOTAMs may affect the 
planned flight. Some of the operations include 
Central Altitude Reservation Function (CARF), 
Special Use Airspace (SUA), Temporary Flight 
Restrictions (TFR), Global Positioning System 
(GPS), Flight Data Center (FDC) changes to routes, 
wind turbine, and Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS). 

NOTE

 

NOTAM information is transmitted using ICAO contrac-
tions to reduce transmission time. See TBL 5

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2 for a 

listing of the most commonly used contractions, or go 

online to the following URL:
 https://www.notams.faa.gov/downloads/contractions.pdf. 
For a complete listing of approved NOTAM Contractions, 
see FAA JO Order 7340.2, Contractions. 

d.  Destination Update.

 Pilots should also contact 

ATC or FSS while en route to obtain updated airfield 
information for their destination. This is particularly 
important when flying to the airports without an 
operating control tower. Snow removal, fire and 
rescue activities, construction, and wildlife encroach-
ment, may pose hazards to pilots. This information 
may not be available to pilots prior to arrival/depar-
ture. 

e.  NAVAID NOTAMs.

 Pilots should check 

NOTAMs to ensure NAVAIDs required for the flight 
are in service. A NOTAM is published when a 
NAVAID is out of service or Unserviceable (U/S). 
Although a NAVAID is deemed U/S and planned for 
removal from service, it may be a long time before 
that NAVAID is officially decommissioned and 
removed from charts. A NOTAM is the primary 
method of alerting pilots to its unavailability. It is 
recommended that pilots using VFR charts should 
regularly consult the Chart Update Bulletin. This 
bulletin identifies any updates to the chart that have 
not yet been accounted for. 

f.  GPS NOTAMs. 

The FAA issues information on 

the status of GPS through the NOTAM system. 
Operators may find information on GPS satellite 
outages, GPS testing, and GPS anomalies by 
specifically searching for GPS NOTAMS prior to 
flight. 

1. 

The NOTAM system uses the terms UNRE-

LIABLE (UNREL), MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE 
(AVBL), and NOT AVAILABLE (AVBL) when 
describing the status of GPS. UNREL indicates the 
expected level of service of the GPS and/or WAAS 
may not be available. Pilots must then determine the 
adequacy of the signal for desired use. Aircraft should 
have additional navigation equipment for their 
intended route. 

NOTE

 

Unless associated with a known testing   NOTAM, pilots 
should report GPS anomalies, including degraded 
operation and/or loss of service, as soon as possible via 
radio or telephone, and via the GPS Anomaly Reporting 
Form. (See 1

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13.) 

2. 

GPS operations may also be NOTAMed for 

testing. This is indicated in the NOTAM language 
with the name of the test in parenthesis. When GPS 

Preflight 

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