background image

12/2/21 

AIM 

6. 

Climb gradients may be specified only to an 

altitude/fix, above which the normal gradient applies. 

An ATC

required altitude restriction published at a 

fix, will not have an associated climb gradient pub­
lished with that restriction. Pilots are expected to 
determine if crossing altitudes can be met, based on 
the performance capability of the aircraft they are op­
erating. 

EXAMPLE

 

“Minimum climb 340 FPNM to ALPHA.” The pilot climbs 
at least 340 FPNM to ALPHA, then at least 200 FPNM to 
MIA. 

7. 

A Visual Climb Over Airport (VCOA) 

procedure is a departure option for an IFR aircraft, 
operating in visual meteorological conditions equal 
to or greater than the specified visibility and ceiling, 
to visually conduct climbing turns over the airport to 
the published “at or above” altitude. At this point, the 
pilot may proceed in instrument meteorological 
conditions to the first en route fix using a diverse 
departure, or to proceed via a published routing to a 
fix from where the aircraft may join the IFR en route 
structure, while maintaining a climb gradient of at 
least 200 feet per nautical mile. VCOA procedures 
are developed to avoid obstacles greater than 3 statute 
miles from the departure end of the runway as an 
alternative to complying with climb gradients greater 
than 200 feet per nautical mile. Pilots are responsible 
to advise ATC as early as possible of the intent to fly 
the VCOA option prior to departure. Pilots are 
expected to remain within the distance prescribed in 
the published visibility minimums during the climb 
over the airport until reaching the “at or above” 
altitude for the VCOA procedure.  If no additional 
routing is published, then the pilot may proceed in 
accordance with their IFR clearance. If additional 
routing is published after the “at

or

above” altitude, 

the pilot must comply with the route to a fix that may 
include a climb

in

holding pattern to reach the 

MEA/MIA for the en route portion of their IFR flight. 
These textual procedures are published in the 
Take

Off Minimums and (Obstacle) Departure 

Procedures section of the Terminal Procedures 
Publications and/or appear as an option on a Graphic 
ODP. 

EXAMPLE

 

TAKEOFF MINIMUMS: Rwy 32, standard with minimum 
climb of 410’ per NM to 3000’ or 1100

3 for VCOA. 

VCOA: Rwy 32, obtain ATC approval for VCOA when 
requesting IFR clearance. Climb in visual conditions to 
cross Broken Bow Muni/Keith Glaze Field at or above 
3500’ before proceeding on course. 

f. 

Who is responsible for obstacle clearance? DPs 

are designed so that adherence to the procedure by the 
pilot will ensure obstacle protection. Additionally: 

1. 

Obstacle clearance responsibility also rests 

with the pilot when he/she chooses to climb in visual 
conditions in lieu of flying a DP and/or depart under 
increased takeoff minima rather than fly the climb 
gradient. Standard takeoff minima are one statute 
mile for aircraft having two engines or less and 
one

half  statute mile for aircraft having more than 

two engines. Specified ceiling and visibility minima 
will allow visual avoidance of obstacles during the 
initial climb at the standard climb gradient. When 
departing using the VCOA, obstacle avoidance is not 
guaranteed if the pilot maneuvers farther from the 
airport than the published visibility minimum for the 
VCOA prior to reaching the published VCOA 
altitude. DPs may also contain what are called Low 
Close in Obstacles. These obstacles are less than 200 
feet above the departure end of runway elevation and 
within one NM of the runway end and do not require 
increased takeoff minimums. These obstacles are 
identified on the SID chart or in the Take

off 

Minimums and (Obstacle) Departure Procedures 
section of the U. S. Terminal Procedure booklet. 
These obstacles are especially critical to aircraft that 
do not lift off until close to the departure end of the 
runway or which climb at the minimum rate. Pilots 
should also consider drift following lift

off to ensure 

sufficient clearance from these obstacles. That 
segment of the procedure that requires the pilot to see 
and avoid obstacles ends when the aircraft crosses the 
specified point at the required altitude. In all cases 
continued obstacle clearance is based on having 
climbed a minimum of 200 feet per nautical mile to 
the specified point and then continuing to climb at 
least 200 foot per nautical mile during the departure 
until reaching the minimum en route altitude unless 
specified otherwise. 

2. 

ATC may vector the aircraft beginning with 

an ATC

assigned heading issued with the initial or 

takeoff clearance followed by subsequent vectors, if 
required, until reaching the minimum vectoring 
altitude by using a published Diverse Vector Area 
(DVA). 

Departure Procedures 

5

2