background image

12/2/21 

AIM 

11. 

Multiple versions of flight plans for the same 

flight may lead to unsafe conditions and errors within 
the air traffic system. Pilots must not file more than 
one flight plan for the same flight without ensuring 
that the previous flight plan has been successfully 
removed. 

12. 

When a pilot is aware that the possibility for 

multiple flight plans on the same aircraft may exist, 
ensuring receipt of a full route clearance will help 
mitigate chances of error. 

REFERENCE

 

AIM, Para 5

1

12, Change in Flight Plan. 

AIM, Para 5

1

13, Change in Proposed Departure Time. 

b.  Airways and Jet Routes Depiction on Flight 

Plan 

1. 

It is vitally important that the route of flight 

be accurately and completely described in the flight 
plan. To simplify definition of the proposed route, 
and to facilitate ATC, pilots are requested to file via 
airways or jet routes established for use at the altitude 
or flight level planned. 

2. 

If flight is to be conducted via designated 

airways or jet routes, describe the route by indicating 
the type and number designators of the airway(s) or 
jet route(s) requested. If more than one airway or jet 
route is to be used, clearly indicate points of 
transition. If the transition is made at an unnamed 
intersection, show the next succeeding NAVAID or 
named intersection on the intended route and the 
complete route from that point. Reporting points may 
be identified by using authorized name/code as 
depicted on appropriate aeronautical charts. The 
following two examples illustrate the need to specify 
the transition point when two routes share more than 
one transition fix. 

EXAMPLE

 

1. 

ALB J37 BUMPY J14 BHM Spelled out: from Albany, 

New York, via Jet Route 37 transitioning to Jet Route 14 at 
BUMPY intersection, thence via Jet Route 14 to 
Birmingham, Alabama. 

2. 

ALB J37 ENO J14 BHM Spelled out: from Albany, New 

York, via Jet Route 37 transitioning to Jet Route 14 at 
Smyrna VORTAC (ENO) thence via Jet Route 14 to 
Birmingham, Alabama. 

3. 

The route of flight may also be described by 

naming the reporting points or NAVAIDs over which 
the flight will pass, provided the points named are 
established for use at the altitude or flight level 
planned. 

EXAMPLE

 

BWI V44 SWANN V433 DQO Spelled out: from 
Baltimore

Washington International, via Victor 44 to 

Swann intersection, transitioning to Victor 433 at Swann, 
thence via Victor 433 to Dupont. 

4. 

When the route of flight is defined by named 

reporting points, whether alone or in combination 
with airways or jet routes, and the navigational aids 
(VOR, VORTAC, TACAN, NDB) to be used for the 
flight are a combination of different types of aids, 
enough information should be included to clearly 
indicate the route requested. 

EXAMPLE

 

LAX J5 LKV J3 GEG YXC FL 330 J500 VLR J515 YWG 
Spelled out: from Los Angeles International via Jet Route 
5 Lakeview, Jet Route 3 Spokane, direct Cranbrook, British 
Columbia VOR/DME, Flight Level 330 Jet Route 500 to 
Langruth, Manitoba VORTAC, Jet Route 515 to Winnipeg, 
Manitoba. 

5. 

When filing IFR, it is to the pilot’s advantage 

to file a preferred route. 

REFERENCE

 

Preferred IFR Routes are described and tabulated in the Chart 
Supplement U.S. 
Additionally available at U.S. 
http://www.fly.faa.gov/Products/Coded_Departure_Routes/NFDC_Pref 
erred_Routes_Database/nfdc_preferred_routes_database.html

6. 

ATC may issue a SID or a STAR, as 

appropriate. 

REFERENCE

 

AIM, Para 5

2

9, Instrument Departure Procedures (DP) 

 Obstacle 

Departure Procedures (ODP) and Standard Instrument Departures 
(SID), and Diverse Vector Areas (DVA). 
AIM, Para 5

4

1, Standard Terminal Arrival (STAR) Procedures. 

NOTE

 

Pilots not desiring an RNAV SID or RNAV STAR should 
enter in Item #18, PBN code: NAV/RNV A0 and/or D0. 

c.  Direct Flights 

1. 

All or any portions of the route which will not 

be flown on the radials or courses of established 
airways or routes, such as direct route flights, must be 
defined by indicating the radio fixes over which the 
flight will pass. Fixes selected to define the route 
must be those over which the position of the aircraft 
can be accurately determined. Such fixes automati-
cally become compulsory reporting points for the 
flight, unless advised otherwise by ATC. Only those 
navigational aids established for use in a particular 
structure; i.e., in the low or high structures, may be 
used to define the en route phase of a direct flight 
within that altitude structure. 

2. 

The azimuth feature of VOR aids and the 

azimuth and distance (DME) features of VORTAC 

Preflight 

5

1

11