background image

AIM 

6/17/21 

integrity is used for a VFR GPS receiver. VFR GPS 
receivers should be used in conjunction with other 
forms of navigation during VFR operations to ensure 
a correct route of flight is maintained. Minimize 
head

down time in the aircraft by being familiar with 

your GPS receiver’s operation and by keeping eyes 
outside scanning for traffic, terrain, and obstacles. 

(e)  VFR Waypoints 

(1) 

VFR waypoints provide VFR pilots 

with a supplementary tool to assist with position 
awareness while navigating visually in aircraft 
equipped with area navigation receivers. VFR 
waypoints should be used as a tool to supplement 
current navigation procedures. The uses of VFR 
waypoints include providing navigational aids for 
pilots unfamiliar with an area, waypoint definition of 
existing reporting points, enhanced navigation in and 
around Class B and Class C airspace, and enhanced 
navigation around Special Use Airspace. VFR pilots 
should rely on appropriate and current aeronautical 
charts published specifically for visual navigation.  If 
operating in a terminal area, pilots should take 
advantage of the Terminal Area Chart available for 
that area, if published. The use of VFR waypoints 
does not relieve the pilot of any responsibility to 
comply with the operational requirements of 14 CFR 
Part 91. 

(2) 

VFR waypoint names (for computer

 

entry and flight plans) consist of five letters 
beginning with the letters “VP” and are retrievable 
from navigation databases. The VFR waypoint 
names are not intended to be pronounceable, and they 
are not for use in ATC communications. On VFR 
charts, stand

alone VFR waypoints will be portrayed 

using the same four

point star symbol used for IFR 

waypoints. VFR waypoints collocated with visual 
check points on the chart will be identified by small 
magenta flag symbols. VFR waypoints collocated 
with visual check points will be pronounceable based 
on the name of the visual check point and may be used 
for ATC communications. Each VFR waypoint name 
will appear in parentheses adjacent to the geographic 
location on the chart. Latitude/longitude data for all 
established VFR waypoints may be found in the 
appropriate regional Chart Supplement U.S. 

(3) 

VFR waypoints may not be used on IFR 

flight plans. VFR waypoints are not recognized by the 
IFR system and will be rejected for IFR routing 
purposes. 

(4) 

Pilots may use the five

letter identifier 

as a waypoint in the route of flight section on a VFR 
flight plan. Pilots may use the VFR waypoints only 
when operating under VFR conditions. The point 
may represent an intended course change or describe 
the planned route of flight. This VFR filing would be 
similar to how a VOR would be used in a route of 
flight. 

(5) 

VFR waypoints intended for use during 

flight should be loaded into the receiver while on the 
ground. Once airborne, pilots should avoid program­
ming routes or VFR waypoint chains into their 
receivers. 

(6) 

Pilots should be vigilant to see and 

avoid other traffic when near VFR waypoints. With 
the increased use of GPS navigation and accuracy, 
expect increased traffic near VFR waypoints. 
Regardless of the class of airspace, monitor the 
available ATC frequency for traffic information on 
other aircraft operating in the vicinity.  See Paragraph 
7

6

2, VFR in Congested Areas, for more 

information. 

2.  IFR Use of GPS 

(a) General Requirements. 

Authorization 

to conduct any GPS operation under IFR requires: 

(1) 

GPS navigation equipment used for IFR 

operations must be approved in accordance with the 
requirements specified in Technical Standard Order 
(TSO) TSO

C129(), TSO

C196(), TSO

C145(), or 

TSO

C146(), and the installation must be done in 

accordance with Advisory Circular AC 20

138, 

Airworthiness Approval of Positioning and Naviga­
tion Systems. Equipment approved in accordance 
with TSO

C115a does not meet the requirements of 

TSO

C129.  Visual flight rules (VFR) and hand

held 

GPS systems are not authorized for IFR navigation, 
instrument approaches, or as a principal instrument 
flight reference. 

(2) 

Aircraft using un­augmented GPS 

(TSO­C129() or TSO­C196()) for navigation under 
IFR must be equipped with an alternate approved and 
operational means of navigation suitable for 
navigating the proposed route of flight. (Examples of 
alternate navigation equipment include VOR or 
DME/DME/IRU capability). Active monitoring of 
alternative navigation equipment is not required 
when RAIM is available for integrity monitoring. 
Active monitoring of an alternate means of 

1

1

22 

Navigation Aids